Comments are now closed due to spamming and personal attacks.

Twitter: https://twitter.com/huffpoclub

NYPD agrees to purge database of people stopped by police

Posted on Thursday, 8th August 2013 @ 10:50 AM by Text Size A | A | A

The New York City Police Department has agreed to purge a database of names and addresses of people stopped by police under the NYPD’s controversial stop-and-frisk program but later cleared of criminal wrongdoing.

The department will cease collecting the information as part of a settlement ending a lawsuit filed in 2010 in state court by the New York Civil Liberties Union, which announced the agreement on Wednesday.

The settlement applies to people issued a summons or arrested after a police stop but whose cases were dismissed or ended with a fine for a noncriminal violation.

“Though much still needs to be done, this settlement is an important step towards curbing the impact of abusive stop-and-frisk practices,” said Christopher Dunn, the NYCLU’s associate legal director.

The city’s law department and an NYPD spokesman did not immediately comment on the settlement.

Dunn said there have been more than half a million stops that included an arrest or a summons since 2004, when he said the NYPD began retaining people’s names in a database for use in future criminal investigations.

The NYPD’s stop-and-frisk strategy, in which patrolling officers stop, question and sometimes frisk suspicious individuals in high-crime neighborhoods, has drawn scrutiny from civil liberties groups concerned that the policy disproportionately affects minorities.

A federal judge in Manhattan is weighing whether to declare the tactic unconstitutional after a 10-week civil trial, a move that could usher in a Department of Justice monitor for the NYPD.

The lawsuit settled Wednesday was filed on behalf of two men who were separately stopped by police in the Bronx and Brooklyn. The men each received two summonses that were later dismissed, but their personal information remained in the NYPD’s database.

New York state law calls for criminal records to be sealed when a case ends in the defendant’s favor, such as a dismissal or an acquittal. In addition, records for defendants convicted of a noncriminal offense, such as a disorderly conduct violation, are also required to be sealed.

The lawsuit claimed the NYPD’s database violated that law by retaining information about defendants who were never convicted of a crime.

Under the terms of the settlement, the city made no admission that the NYPD had violated the plaintiffs’ rights. The city also paid the NYCLU $10,000 as part of the agreement.

The NYPD will continue to track some non-identifying data, including race, for people who are stopped to allow ongoing monitoring of the stop-and-frisk program.

Related News On HPUB:

  • Last Call to be the World Leader in Outer Space. by Daniel Bruno

    Last Call to be World Leader First posted: 03/18/2010 at Huffpo “Where is that moon, that leads to your soul?” – Aromabar     Legend has it that Kaguya descended from a race of moon…

  • Electoral Science: The Winner of the 2016 Election Will be a Republican

    Originally published at Washington’s Blog in April, 2016   by Daniel Bruno   Electoral Science: The Winner of the 2016 Election Will be a Republican I was the first person in the world to proclaim…

  • Report from Rio

    Report from Rio Daniel “No Passport” Bruno, reporting from Rio de Janeiro. Daniel is from Manhattan, is an author, inventor, specialist in 9/11 studies, and the interview host at www.hpub.org which publishes over 1000 censored…

  • The New Common Sense. by Daniel Bruno

        Americans need to retire the two party system. Congressional approval ratings hover around 8% yet most members are re-elected over and over again. The old definitions of liberal and conservative, left and right,…

... post your own so far 0 comments

Comments

No comments yet.

Leave a Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.

 
  • Hpub asks

    • Will Trump Survive to January 1, 2018 ?

      View Results

      Loading ... Loading ...